Hello, Snacking Shelled Fellow

I was having dinner with friends and they have turtles in the backyard. No, they have tortoises, because turtles tend to water and tortoises are land dwellers.

Apparently they like snacking on hibiscus flowers, so my daughter laid a path to draw them out of their nest area.

Being the photographer always looking for angles, I used two skills to grab a quick video.

  • Anticipate where your subject will likely go
  • Get on the same level as your subject

These are great tips when photographing children, and tortoises, it turns out. Both are more adorable if you can see their faces and eyes, so don’t film their backs or the top of their heads if there’s a better angle. And if they are on the move, set up in a spot where they are heading. Here I went for a likely snack.

If photographing your kids, draw them in with a toy or snack, wait at the bottom of a slide, or get a camera in front of them while playing or showing them something new and fun.

But remember to enjoy time with them too. If if they are sometimes animals.

—–David

P.S. This was shot with the stock Android app and edited with the Video Editor on my old Samsung Note 4 so I could replace the audio craziness with simple stock music, which was available right in the app, and since it’s royalty free I can post it anywhere without out being taken down. And since I could do this on my phone I didn’t have to wait to post it, or transfer video to a computer first.
Unfortunately my phone is misbehaving so that was an impediment, but a new phone is on the way and I got to be nostalgic with my classic Note.

P.P.S. Two tortoises cozy in their housetwo tortoises cozy in their house creative uploads

Hello, Snacking Shelled Fellow was originally published on Creative Uploads

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Bark! Insert Dog Pun (And Video) Here

Amy the Dog in “Dog Years,” a movie made with Google Assistant. A few years ago I wrote * about how cool this app was and how easy it made it to share pictures and video snippets in video form. It’s better and worse, but still neat and still only on Android and iOS.


Click To See the video from the new Google+ post here!

Thanks to face recognition in the Google Photos ecosystem, you can make a quick movie featuring a specific individual, or even your dog if you have enough pictures. I literally picked a sideways shot with Amy in it and Photos Assistant found the rest of the pictures based off of that, always including her in the ones it chose. It seems to be in chronological order too, which I like as a default, although you can and I did rearrange some of the order and timing of the images, which is really easy to do with the very basic graphical editor.

Amy The Dog Photos Movies On Creative Uploads

The music? I let Google pick the music and it’s perfectly cheesy and appropriate for such an experiment as this.

This movie was made on my iPad, and now I am going to have to explore the Android version again, because at least in iOS it has been simplified and lost some of the things I thought made it unique, in favor of other cheesier looking templates. But let me check the more native version and get back to you. It looks like it doesn’t support titles over the video anymore (although if you post to YouTube you can overlay text on existing video so you can mimic that kind of presentation.)

Some other Assistant Tricks shown on the Google Photos Assistant page - Creative Uploads

In the meantime, here’s a cute timeline of one of my dogs.

—–David

P.S. This was originally posted on our “Creative Upload” Google+ page to experiment with how the links all worked out, but as I write this it occurs to me that this updated post will probably cross post back…. Sorry about that but at least there’s more stuff.

* Another still useful post on Google Assistant is here though it mentions some now absent features.

Bark! Insert Dog Pun (And Video) Here was originally published on Creative Uploads

March To The Beat Of Your Own Steel Drum

Taken during the downtown Phoenix Festival For The Arts.

The featured image is a portrait rather than a wide angle, and gives a great example how framing can create a different mood and feeling with the same subjects. Here he seems empty and alone, maybe even ignored. In the portrait there is height, perhaps something to climb or aspire to. But in both he seems to be soldiering on, pounded out his own beat regardless of audience.

Something we should aspire to.

Whether the viewer wants to add an empathetic emotional layer of foolishness, sadness, grit or something else is up to them.

In reality, the steel drummer could have set his drums up the other way, facing the rows of food and market tents set up on the street behind him, facing any potential audience, but he didn’t. And I could tell you about any audience, but I chose not to by shooting this picture instead.

Steel yourself for anything, and march to the beat of your own drum.

—–David

P.S. He was pretty good.

P.P.S. Taken with my Galaxy Note 4 that I don’t want to replace yet, with a little cropping and edit in Google Photos.

March To The Beat Of Your Own Steel Drum was originally published on Creative Uploads

What Does Prisma Have In Store For Us?

The iOS Prisma app (and presumably Android soon) now has a Store, represented by a tiny little storefront icon. Click on it to open the Store page and you will be greeted by a bunch of little icons.

Creative uploads Prisma app style filter store

There are a bunch of new “styles” though to be fair they include a lot of color swap type filters rather than the more artistically textured ones I like. But there are texture tricks here as well, like “Bubbles”, “Stones” and “Crystal”, which offers sharp edges and a blue cast. All these “New Releases” are still free, although I don’t know if they will figure out a way to start charging for them — I can’t imagine in this day and age that they won’t, at least for certain premium ones.

Below that is a “Popular In Your Country” section, which is self-explanatory and jibes with the international feel but localized content Prisma is pushing, especially in their social site, which forces you to turn on geolocation features to populate your feed with people near you.

Under there are “All The Old Styles” in case you missed something.

But my favorite feature is actually under the ribbon at the top of the page.

It takes you to a “My Styles”section where you can manage the styles you see in the app when processing photos.


Even better, you can tap any of the icons to see a collection of photos processed with that style, which lets you learn how it looks in different situations. This means that you can, as I like to urge you, pick the best style for your photo, and in fact shoot photos with the style in mind.

But it doesn’t stop there. With this update you can remove styles that you don’t care to use. What if you remove one that you want back? At the top of this ribbon page you can manage your style collection, adding and removing styles from the complete list of those available.

As a very early adopter I can tell you that it doesn’t have the “Palmolive” style that it launched with, for example, so the advertising styles seem temporary and I don’t know if they get renamed and come back — so far it doesn’t look like it.

All in all a pretty cool update, although I will say that I do not see the styles I added to the list on my iPad showing up in my Android app yet. I would imagine that is because you cannot yet “manage” the list in Android (which has not been updated as I write this; it always lags behind), not because the styles are incompatible.

As always I will note there are many fake copies of this app out there. The one I use is available through Prisma-ai.com and is a universal free app. Don’t pay some scammer $10 for an iPad version.

.—– David

P.S. Can I say: I don’t feel insecure about giving Prisma my location info for the feed. My personal problem is that I do not like to take photos that I post publicly with location information embedded in them, and I do not know if allowing the app to see the info will in fact embed very specific coordinates in the image, or if it simply uses it to group my feed with the city I live in, and not, let’s say, center the map on my house.

I turn on location info when I’m on a trip because I don’t care about people knowing where I’ve been, but I don’t publicly advertise addresses where I sleep and work.

What Does Prisma Have In Store For Us? was originally published on Creative Uploads

Prisma Goes Widescreen

In addition to new styles, Comic, Old-Fashioned and a Land Rover-sponsored Winter, you are no longer constrained to a square picture, so no automatic cropping. 

Creative uploads piano keys
Unfortunately that also means if you wanted a square aspect ratio you have to crop in something else first (Instagram will do it if you export to them, otherwise do it before you start.)

If you take a picture in the app, it’s full portrait, which displays under some of the controls (though you can hide them to preview). So you can no longer shoot square in the app that I found, and if you want a widescreen landscape aspect you have to shoot with another camera app and import it from your gallery, at least in my iOS experiments.

—–David

Don't forget the cheese says creative uploads
P.S. It aso has this weird split screen feature; when you slide your finger in the screen you can adjust the force of the style in percentage. That still happens but if you tap it brings up a split screen, half unfiltered and half with the chosen style. It seems like each tap twists the dividing line: horizontal, diagonal, vertical, off. It could be useful but it’s also annoying since that’s not what I want when adjusting the style.


P.P.S. Cropped and filtered more in Instagram. I am on there, As @megawatson, though I sometimes forget to feed it.

Prisma Goes Widescreen was originally published on Creative Uploads